Offley Road Butterfly Windows
Offley Road London Bedroom
Offley Road Kitchen

Seven Loft-Style Apartments

 

The project involved the demolition of existing buildings and the construction of a new property with seven loft-style apartments, including a basement storey.

 

We were commissioned to design a new building to link together an Edwardian terrace and a four-storey 1920s industrial warehouse building, which each had very different architectural styles.

CLIENT: 

Developer

 

LOCATION: 

Offley Road, Oval, London

 

PROJECT: 

Architectural Design of Link Building

The Challenge

This new development was on a very constricted mid-terrace site in south west London. The new building needed to couple together an Edwardian terrace and a four-storey 1920s industrial warehouse building, providing a link between their very different styles.

 

The rear of the proposed development presented particularly challenging design issues, as there were neighbouring properties in very close proximity, so we had to address potential overlooking and privacy issues.

 

The scheme needed to consider how natural daylight could be introduced to the deep-plan basement area. There was also a planning requirement to provide an amenity space in a high-density urban environment.

The Solution

Our architectural approach to the design was to reflect the bold and dominant industrial aesthetic of the 1920s warehouse of the adjacent building, creating a focal ‘end stop’ to the Edwardian street scene.

 

The junction between the new scheme and the Edwardian terrace is defined by a four-storey vertical ribbon of glass which terminated, at the ground floor, with a feature main entrance.

 

The plan allowed daylight to be introduced to the basement storey by introducing an open courtyard to the rear, and adding feature glass strips cut into the fabric of the building.

 

Feature ‘butterfly’ window bays at the rear let plenty of light into the new apartments, but direct views away from neighbouring properties and create a dramatic sculptural effect on the back of the building.

 

An enclosed, fully-glazed rooftop garden provides communal amenity space for the enjoyment of all the residents of the new building.

The Result

This imaginative, comprehensive development utilised the whole site and was favoured by the planners.

 

The introduction of the ‘butterfly windows’ ensure that there is no overlooking to the properties behind, despite minimal separation distances, providing privacy for immediate neighbours and residents in the new building alike.

 

This was a good example of successful use of a constricted brownfield site in a dense urban area with a design that enhances and revitalises the street.

 

The flats were sold off-plan and achieved the maximum sale price for the area at the time.